The Anglo–Spanish War (1585–1604)

How it started

Britain Spain
Free Trade Free Trade
Use of Privateers (Pirates) Gold Trade
Slave Trade Stop smuggling

The Anglo-Spanish War of 1585–1604 was a conflict between the kingdoms of England under Elizabeth I and Spain under Philip II. The war opened with victory for the English at Cádiz in 1587 and over the Spanish Armada in 1588, but the Elizabethans were unable to follow up their victories and the war after the Armada went increasingly in Spain's favor

Economic competition between the two countries in general had sparked tensions since Sir John Hawkins initiated English participation in the trans-Atlantic slave trade in 1562, soon gaining royal support. The Spanish regarded Hawkins' actions as illegal smuggling to their colonies in the West Indies, leading them to surprise and sink several ships in a slaving expedition led by Hawkins and Sir Francis Drake at San Juan de Ulúa, near Veracruz, Mexico, in 1568. San Juan de Ulua served as the diplomatic incident that soured the Anglo-Spanish relations, which had hitherto been amicable, embittering Drake and Hawkins so much that they and other English sailors took up privateering as a way to break a the Spanish monopoly on Atlantic trade. The activities of English privateers on the Spanish Main in the years leading up to the war had severely dented the Spanish treasury.

Aftermath

Britain Spain
Free Trade Free Trade
Use of Privateers (Pirates) Gold Trade
Slave Trade Stop smuggling